Forty Under Forty: William Miller

By

1 | 2 } 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40

 

William Miller

Chief Development Officer

The Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of New York


I’D LIKE TO SEE US GO OUT OF BUSINESS

Fast fact: Favorite cartoon growing up? ThunderCats.

 

Bill Miller knows the value of a good mentor. He was recruited by the late CEO of CCS Fundraising right out of college, and “12 years later, here I am.” He leads advancement activities for the archdiocese with an emphasis on individual, major and planned gifts as well as board support for a $100 million Centennial Campaign. He also oversees special events, corporate and foundation grants, e-philanthropy and direct response. He is a Certified Fund Raising Executive and has received industry awards for his work on prospect research and case statement development. Miller is a proud husband and father to Becky and Paige.

 

NYN: DESCRIBE AN ACCOMPLISHMENT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF.

WM: I’d say the hallmark of my career so far – I served as the executive director for the Diocese of Pittsburgh’s $125 million capital and endowment campaign, and fortunately for me that was successful. We raised about $230 million. A lot of luck was involved in that, but to my knowledge that’s the most any diocese in the country has ever raised. Archdiocese have raised more because they’re larger, but no other diocese has raised more money.

 

NYN: WHAT CHANGE WOULD MOST HELP THE INDIVIDUALS YOUR ORGANIZATION SERVES?

WM: When we’re at meetings with donors and prospective donors we’re always saying that we are both happy and sad. We’re happy because of the impact we’re having helping New Yorkers in need, but we’re sad because we have to help so many people. If there’s one thing that I would like to see change, would simply be – and I mean we already have a tremendous impact on hundreds of thousands of New Yorkers – but if we do our job correctly, I’d like to see us go out of business.

 

NYN: WHAT IS THE ONE THING YOU’D LIKE TO ACCOMPLISH BEFORE YOU RETIRE?

WM: In the near term, I would like to have Catholic Charities have a successful Centennial campaign. And over the long term I would like to have a positive impact on any and all organizations I work with, hopefully leave them better than I found them and hopefully have a positive experience in mentoring and coaching those that work for me.

 

NYN: WHAT DO YOU WISH PEOPLE KNEW ABOUT YOUR JOB?

WM: My parents always say, “Well, if you’re in development aren’t you just going to a bunch of fundraising dinners?” And while there is some of that, it’s really a lot of behind-the-scenes work. It’s not a 9-to-5 job. I really applaud everybody in the industry because you’re working a lot of hours. It’s a lot of hard work and it’s well worth it and it’s rewarding. But sometimes I don’t know that everybody knows exactly how much goes into development. You’re only as good as your colleagues. I really appreciate and respect everybody I work with because I wouldn’t be successful if it wasn’t for them.

 

Commenting is closed for this article.