Forty Under Forty: Lauren Profeta

By

1 | 2 } 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40

 

Lauren Profeta

Director of Development

New York Police and Fire Widows' and Children's Benefit Fund


MORE THAN A HOBBY

Fast fact: Profeta’s favorite cartoon growing up? Rainbow Brite.


Since 2013, Profeta has managed day-to-day functions and overseen all fundraising and programming initiatives at the New York Police and Fire Widows’ and Children’s Benefit Fund. Previously, she served as the development director of Only Make Believe, which brings interactive theater to hospitalized children. Prior to that she was a litigation associate at Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP, and worked on pro-bono cases and charitable causes. Profeta graduated summa cum laude from St. John’s University with a B.A. in English literature and cum laude from Harvard Law School. She is the proud sister of three New York City first responders.

 

NYN: HOW DID YOU BECOME INTERESTED IN YOUR FIELD?

LP: I had attended law school and my favorite part of law school was a child advocacy clinic that I did. Out of everything, all the programs and things I participated in in law school, I found that to be the most intellectually rewarding, personally rewarding. I kind of knew that I wanted to switch from law to nonprofit. I come from a family of first responders. I grew up in a neighborhood full of first responders, so I know these families very well. And I couldn’t think of a population that I would rather dedicate my profession serving, then the families of fallen first responders.

 

NYN: DESCRIBE AN ACCOMPLISHMENT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF.

LP: I think making the transition – from law to nonprofit – is something that I’m most proud of. I think that there’s a certain safety in remaining a lawyer, but making the jump and following where my passions were is definitely something that I feel most proud of and certainly has been the most rewarding outcome as well.

 

NYN: WHAT CHANGE WOULD MOST HELP THE FIRST RESPONDERS YOUR ORGANIZATION SERVES?

LP: I think just people not forgetting about them. I think that when we lose a first responder our first reaction is to say we’ll never forget, but sadly we do forget. These families can be forgotten unless we all as a city, as a community, make that pledge that we will not forget about them – their sacrifice.

 

NYN: WHAT IS THE ONE THING YOU’D LIKE TO ACCOMPLISH BEFORE YOU RETIRE?

LP: I hope that I leave the workforce and the community I live in better than the state in which I found it when I first started working.

 

NYN: WHAT DO YOU WISH PEOPLE KNEW ABOUT YOUR JOB?

LP: I think that a lot of times people think of nonprofit careers as hobbies and not necessarily as professions. I think a lot of times people don’t realize all of the hard work that goes behind it. Just for people to be aware that this truly is a calling. This is a full-time career and an important one. If you want nonprofits to run efficiently as for-profits do, you need to have people similarly skilled to run these groups.

 

Commenting is closed for this article.