Human services nonprofits push for more funding in New York state budget

The state Capitol in Albany, N.Y.
The state Capitol in Albany, N.Y.
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Human services nonprofits push for more funding in New York state budget

And other updates from across New York.
January 16, 2019

A human services bake sale sought to entice state legislators on Jan. 15. Advocates for nonprofits that contract for the state are seeking more funding in the upcoming state budget, and each of the items on the menu reflected a different request, like “For Goodness Cake, Fund the COLA.” If the state fails to fund the $140 million cost-of-living adjustment for nonprofit workers then advocates would need to sell only 70 million slices of such cake to replace that funding. If they sold 25 million “Oatmeal Raisin-g Infrastructure Cookies” then they could buy all the capital improvements they need. “Flaking Funding Croissants” aim to raise awareness of the $25 million advocates say they need to fund a minimum wage mandate, according to a Jan. 15 press release from the Strong Nonprofits for a Better New York coalition. “Empty Promise Cupcakes” were $0.

“Not-for-profits have provided New York State with many of the advancements in our communities we see today,” State Sen. Roxanne J. Persaud said in the press release, “And established housing, faith, health, senior services, immigration, youth development, business and other organizations that many depend on. I support better, well-deserved financial support for our nonprofit human services providers and the places they operate in.”

The proposed budget unveiled by Gov. Andrew Cuomo later that day did not include the requested funding, so chances are that lawmakers will get another chance to sample the bittersweet, fiscally minded confections.
 

 

Community Access is getting a new CEO. Current Deputy CEO Cal Hedigan will lead the mental health nonprofit where she has worked since 1999, effective July 1. She will succeed Steve Coe, who will retire after 40 years at the nonprofit, according to a Jan. 10 press release. The Coe Campaign – named in his honor – seeks to raise $4 million.

 

Breaking Ground has won a $1.79 million contract with the New York City Department of Social Services. The money will fund through June 2024 single room occupancy units for single adults at 500 West 42nd St. in Manhattan, according to the City Record. Clinton Housing Development Company has received an $841,069 contract to provide the same services for the department at that address. Services and Advocacy for Gay Lesbian and Transgender Elders has got a $1.24 million, 18-month extension through June 2020 to operate a senior center on behalf of the Department for the Aging.

 

The nonprofit Amida Care is celebrating a soon-to-be state law that bans gay conversion therapy and TGNC discrimination. New York will be the 15th state to ban the controversial treatment that purports to make people straight, following votes by the state Senate and Assembly on Jan. 15. Another bill passed by the Legislature that day makes it illegal to discriminate against transgender and queer people in employment and health care. Gov. Andrew Cuomo has said that he will sign both bills. The new laws could not come soon enough, according to Amida Care President Doug Wirth.

“The Gender Expression Non-Discrimination Act legally codifies protections for transgender and gender non-conforming people against discrimination in employment and health care,” he said in a press release. “This legislation is more important now than ever.  By repeatedly changing regulations to exclude TGNC people from protections against discrimination in health care, the Trump administration has embarked on a campaign to effectively erase them. GENDA is essential to ensuring gender equity in New York State”

Zach Williams
Zach Williams
is a staff reporter at New York Nonprofit Media and sister publication City & State.
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