Modular housing finds a home in Brooklyn

The Brooklyn Bridge in the distance between two rows of brick buildings near the waterfront.
The Brooklyn Bridge in the distance between two rows of brick buildings near the waterfront.
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Modular housing finds a home in Brooklyn

And other updates from across New York.
March 8, 2019

The Mental Health Association of Westchester has a new chief innovation officer. Courtney Beach has previously worked as a consultant as the Massachusetts eHealth Collaborative, where she specialized in clinical workflows and patient experience. She has a bachelor’s in science from LeMoyne College and will be the first person to fill the newly created position, according to a press release.

“She will play a critical role in developing strategies to advance our core goals surrounding a belief in recovery for all and quality care for our clients,” said Charlotte Östman, CEO of the association. “The current value-based health care environment requires the efficient collection, reporting, and analysis of information to measure effectiveness and customer satisfaction.”

 

A new affordable housing project in Brooklyn is using modular housing. This technique essentially will allow the 167-unit housing project in East New York to be assembled piece-by-piece with prefabricated parts to cut costs and time. If all goes well, the project will open in 2022, BK Reader writes.

 

The Coalition for the Homeless and other groups are keeping up the pressure on New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio. They want him to double the share thathomeless New Yorkers get in the mayor’s 300,000-unit housing plan. Only by earmarking 10 percent of those units can the city adequately address record homelessness, according to a March 7 press release. Seven City Council members and other advocates signed on and took part in a town hall meeting on the subject in New York City.

The event was hosted by House Our Future NY – an alliance of 64 organizations including the Coalition for the Homeless, The Legal Aid Society, Henry Street Settlement, Homeless Services United, Safe Horizon, Services for the UnderServed, and Win.

 

A group of nonprofits will share in $21.1 million in contract renewals with the New York City Department of Social Services. The money will fund supportive housing for people living with HIV/AIDS through June 2020, according to the City Record. The organizations include Camba, Faces New York, Harlem Congregations, Harlem United, Harlem United, Iris House, Praxis, and St. Nicks Alliance. The Jericho Project has received a new six-year, $3.53 million contract with the agency to fund single-room occupancy housing for homeless people through June 2024.

 

Nonprofit advocates pushed hard for more U.S. Census outreach in the state Capitol this week. Dozens of activists swarmed the hallways in support of $40 million more in funding in the upcoming state budget. That funding would help ensure that undocumented immigrants and other groups are fully counted, and ensure more funding for the state and representation in Congress, say supporters. Groups participating in a Feb. 5 rally at the Capitol included The New York Immigration Coalition and Chhaya CDC, as well as elected officials.

Zach Williams
Zach Williams
is a staff reporter at New York Nonprofit Media and sister publication City & State.
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